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Ayesha Curry wants to revive the lost art of family meals

The budding lifestyle mogul also gave some advice for would-be boss ladies

March 11th, 2019 2:18 PM

COOKING UP INSPIRATION: Ayesha Curry during a live cooking demonstration at Macy's in Chicago on March 4. The businesswoman says budding entrepreneurs should be persistent in achieving their dreams. | SHANEL ROMAIN/Contributors

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By SHANEL ROMAIN

Contributor

She's a restauranteur. A bestselling author. A television host. A wife. A mom. A foodie. And on March 4, she took a brief moment out of her busy schedule to chat with Austin Weekly News at Macy's in Chicago, moments before she put on a cooking demonstration for a crowd of wide-eyed onlookers. 

"My whole mission — and why I do what I do — is to try and bring families closer together," said Curry, the wife of NBA point guard Stephen Curry and mother of three. "I want to get families back to the basics of preparing a meal together and sitting them down at the family table." 

Curry, 29, said that she noticed that family meals, or simply meals enjoyed among loved ones, was becoming a "lost art" among many of her friends and peers. 

"Those are the fundamentals I grew up with," she said. "A lot of people stopped doing that at some point. My missions is to keep [alive the tradition of eating together] and have people understand what an impact it has on your family." 

So what advice would she give budding entrepreneurs, particularly young female entrepreneurs, on the West Side? 

"There's so much misogyny out here and so many people who are going to try to diminish your dreams," she said. "I've been told no a hundred million times more than I've been told yes. You have to keep in mind that you only need one yes. If you have a dream, don't stop until you get there — no matter how much people discourage you." 

Success, Curry said, is never easy.  

"Nothing worth having is easy," she said. "It's hard work. People look at me and think things have been handed to me, but I've had to plow through a lot of stigma that kept me from getting into certain doors. It took a long time for people to take me seriously. You just have to keep your head on straight and drown out the noise."

CONTACT: michael@austinweeklynews.com